Wir danken folgenden Firmen für Ihre großzügigen Spenden!
© Kekeli Togo e.V.
Easter in Togo Holy Week begins on Palm Sunday. Three times during the Holy Week there are services and prayers, on Thursday ( Holy Thursday ) there are services in the evening in all parishes where the feet are washed. On Good Friday from 12. Uhr there are different ways of the cross (with 12 stations over about 10 km) which are finished in the parishes with the service. On Holy Saturday there are confessions (for the Catholic Church) and on Easter Sunday from 4.00 am there is a resurrection service and at noon Easter meal (at the same time as breaking the fast). But this time everything is cancelled because of curfew. Everyone should experience this at home.

Here you will find information about the country and the people of Togo.

Food in Togo Yams is the most important staple food in Togo. In the north, where it is drier, mainly millet and corn are cultivated. The main Togolese dishes are pâté for everyday life and fufu for Sundays! PâtéPâté is made from corn, or more precisely: from corn flour. This is stirred into hot water to make a paste. It is served with a hot sauce. The corn porridge is often eaten in the morning, if you have breakfast at all. The most important meals are those at noon and in the evening. fufuThe national dish of Togo is fufu. It is eaten with pleasure on Sundays or at festivals. Fufu is stomped from yams. One eats it also in Ghana with pleasure. Here you can find a video where fufu is stomped. The stomping takes a long time and is quite exhausting! That's probably why fufu stomping is the only activity in the household where you can see a man...Also fufu is eaten with a spicy sauce, which can be tomato, palm oil or peanut sauce. Maybe some goat or chicken meat is added. But meat is expensive, that's why it's rare. Bananas and beans, manioc, rice and noodles. People also like to eat plantains and beans. To the beans there is gari, that is grated from roasted manioc, or rice. And finally: noodles are also available. These are almost always spaghetti, which you eat with a sauce or as a noodle salad. Rice and noodles are sometimes also available together - for us probably rather unusual. As vegetables, for example, there are aubergines, tomatoes or corn on the cob. With your right hand! In Togo people traditionally eat with their right hand and from a large pot. But sometimes everybody gets his own little bowl. Before and after the meal, the hand is washed in a bowl of water, which is also ready. For eating, the Togolese actually only needs two or three fingers, with which he picks up the fufu, for example. You form a ball with a hole, with which you take the sauce. You can find recipes here www.cuisine228.com
The schools in Togo The school system Primary school: with 6 years -1. 2nd year CP1,CP2 -3. 4th year CE1, CE2 -5. 6. year CM1, CM2 Completion: CEPD The Collège: (lower secondary level) Duration 4 years -Sixième -Cinqième -Quatrième -troisième (graduation class) Closure: BEPC ( middle maturity) The Lycée (upper secondary level) Duration 3 years -Seconde -première -terminal Closure: Baccalauréat (the baccalauréat) University end of a school year Divided into trimesters. The grading system ranges from 0 to 20 points and 10 points must be achieved. School facilities -School building -School power supply -lessons -teaching system -teaching aids School in Togo Schools often have holes in the walls that do not let in as much heat. Sometimes even the benches are missing. In Togo you get schooling at the age of six. Only since 2008 has primary school in Togo been free. Since then, the number of children who actually go to school has increased. Nine-year-old Komla worked in his parents' fields instead of going to school, and twelve-year-old Céline tended the cattle. Now they attend school and learn to read, write and do arithmetic. Not everyone goes to school But 7 percent of boys and 13 percent of girls are still not enrolled in school at all. Their family may not be able to pay for exercise books or may want the child to help with the harvest. Even the school uniform has to be bought. It is not pursued by the authorities if a child does not go to school. Six years of compulsory schooling Compulsory schooling, i.e. how long the law prescribes that you have to go to school, is also only six years. That corresponds to primary school. After the sixth grade, compulsory schooling ends. Accordingly, only 52 percent of boys and 41 percent of girls attend secondary school. But those who do go on to school have four years of secondary school after primary school. After the 10th grade you graduate. Only a few pupils continue their education after that, to the Gymnasium (lycée). After three years one can take the Abitur. The entire school system is based on the French school system. At the end of each grade there is a test. Those who fail the test must repeat the class. You can do this as often as you like. If pupils do not listen to the teacher, it is quite common that they are beaten with a stick. There are no schools in the countryside In the city the offer is bigger and better than in the country. In the countryside the children are more likely to be forced to work and so they do not attend school. Or there is no school near their home. Often there are not enough teachers. The classes are very large. 70 or 80 pupils in a class are normal! There are hardly any school books. The equipment of the individual schools is very different. Schools without windows And what does such a school look like? Sometimes schools in the villages are simply open huts, a few tree posts and a roof over them. If the school is a permanent building, but then there are no glass panes in the windows! You don't need them because it is never so cold that you have to close them. Therefore, the buildings only have holes in some places to let in air and light. You can see that in the middle picture on the left. In the classroom there are school benches and a blackboard on the wall. The schoolyards are not paved and there is no playground equipment.
What grows in Togo? Togo may be narrow, but it is as long as the Ivory Coast or Ghana. Thus, very different landscapes extend over this length. At the coast in the south, mangroves and coconut palms grow. In the savannah in the north, grasses and isolated bushes and trees grow. The baobab tree also belongs to it. Trees also grow on the slopes of the Togo mountains. Where there is still rainforest there are precious woods like mahogany or teak.
Wir danken folgenden Firmen für Ihre großzügigen Spenden!
© Kekeli Togo e.V.

Here you will find information about

the country and the people of Togo.

Food in Togo Yams is the most important staple food in Togo. In the north, where it is drier, mainly millet and corn are cultivated. The main Togolese dishes are pâté for everyday life and fufu for Sundays! PâtéPâté is made from corn, or more precisely: from corn flour. This is stirred into hot water to make a paste. It is served with a hot sauce. The corn porridge is often eaten in the morning, if you have breakfast at all. The most important meals are those at noon and in the evening. fufuThe national dish of Togo is fufu. It is eaten with pleasure on Sundays or at festivals. Fufu is stomped from yams. One eats it also in Ghana with pleasure. Here you can find a video where fufu is stomped. The stomping takes a long time and is quite exhausting! That's probably why fufu stomping is the only activity in the household where you can see a man...Also fufu is eaten with a spicy sauce, which can be tomato, palm oil or peanut sauce. Maybe some goat or chicken meat is added. But meat is expensive, that's why it's rare. Bananas and beans, manioc, rice and noodles. People also like to eat plantains and beans. To the beans there is gari, that is grated from roasted manioc, or rice. And finally: noodles are also available. These are almost always spaghetti, which you eat with a sauce or as a noodle salad. Rice and noodles are sometimes also available together - for us probably rather unusual. As vegetables, for example, there are aubergines, tomatoes or corn on the cob. With your right hand! In Togo people traditionally eat with their right hand and from a large pot. But sometimes everybody gets his own little bowl. Before and after the meal, the hand is washed in a bowl of water, which is also ready. For eating, the Togolese actually only needs two or three fingers, with which he picks up the fufu, for example. You form a ball with a hole, with which you take the sauce. You can find recipes here www.cuisine228.com
The schools in Togo The school system Primary school: with 6 years -1. 2nd year CP1,CP2 -3. 4th year CE1, CE2 -5. 6. year CM1, CM2 Completion: CEPD The Collège: (lower secondary level) Duration 4 years -Sixième -Cinqième -Quatrième -troisième (graduation class) Closure: BEPC ( middle maturity) The Lycée (upper secondary level) Duration 3 years -Seconde -première -terminal Closure: Baccalauréat (the baccalauréat) University end of a school year Divided into trimesters. The grading system ranges from 0 to 20 points and 10 points must be achieved. School facilities -School building -School power supply -lessons -teaching system -teaching aids School in Togo Schools often have holes in the walls that do not let in as much heat. Sometimes even the benches are missing. In Togo you get schooling at the age of six. Only since 2008 has primary school in Togo been free. Since then, the number of children who actually go to school has increased. Nine-year-old Komla worked in his parents' fields instead of going to school, and twelve-year-old Céline tended the cattle. Now they attend school and learn to read, write and do arithmetic. Not everyone goes to school But 7 percent of boys and 13 percent of girls are still not enrolled in school at all. Their family may not be able to pay for exercise books or may want the child to help with the harvest. Even the school uniform has to be bought. It is not pursued by the authorities if a child does not go to school. Six years of compulsory schooling Compulsory schooling, i.e. how long the law prescribes that you have to go to school, is also only six years. That corresponds to primary school. After the sixth grade, compulsory schooling ends. Accordingly, only 52 percent of boys and 41 percent of girls attend secondary school. But those who do go on to school have four years of secondary school after primary school. After the 10th grade you graduate. Only a few pupils continue their education after that, to the Gymnasium (lycée). After three years one can take the Abitur. The entire school system is based on the French school system. At the end of each grade there is a test. Those who fail the test must repeat the class. You can do this as often as you like. If pupils do not listen to the teacher, it is quite common that they are beaten with a stick. There are no schools in the countryside In the city the offer is bigger and better than in the country. In the countryside the children are more likely to be forced to work and so they do not attend school. Or there is no school near their home. Often there are not enough teachers. The classes are very large. 70 or 80 pupils in a class are normal! There are hardly any school books. The equipment of the individual schools is very different. Schools without windows And what does such a school look like? Sometimes schools in the villages are simply open huts, a few tree posts and a roof over them. If the school is a permanent building, but then there are no glass panes in the windows! You don't need them because it is never so cold that you have to close them. Therefore, the buildings only have holes in some places to let in air and light. You can see that in the middle picture on the left. In the classroom there are school benches and a blackboard on the wall. The schoolyards are not paved and there is no playground equipment.
What grows in Togo? Togo may be narrow, but it is as long as the Ivory Coast or Ghana. Thus, very different landscapes extend over this length. At the coast in the south, mangroves and coconut palms grow. In the savannah in the north, grasses and isolated bushes and trees grow. The baobab tree also belongs to it. Trees also grow on the slopes of the Togo mountains. Where there is still rainforest there are precious woods like mahogany or teak.
Easter in Togo Holy Week begins on Palm Sunday. Three times during the Holy Week there are services and prayers, on Thursday ( Holy Thursday ) there are services in the evening in all parishes where the feet are washed. On Good Friday from 12. Uhr there are different ways of the cross (with 12 stations over about 10 km) which are finished in the parishes with the service. On Holy Saturday there are confessions (for the Catholic Church) and on Easter Sunday from 4.00 am there is a resurrection service and at noon Easter meal (at the same time as breaking the fast). But this time everything is cancelled because of curfew. Everyone should experience this at home.
Kekeli Togo e.V.
Kekeli Togo e.V.